Wedgwood dating

Wedgwood’s next big success was another refinement, this time of a style known as Egyptian black.Wedgwood called his version Black Basalt, and produced vases and urns with a smooth, matte black finish.On the surfaces of these vases, he painted Etruscan scenes in rusty red—the handles ranged from lion’s heads to swans.

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Josiah Wedgwood founded the Staffordshire pottery that bears his name in 1759.

The company’s rise to prominence was extraordinarily fast, in part because Wedgwood initially focused on refining existing techniques and working in traditional forms rather creating something entirely new from scratch.

He also appeared to understand the power of branding and marketing.

His first major success, and the one that would open doors for his company throughout the rest of his life, occurred in 1765, when he developed a cream-colored earthenware of Cornish clay and presented a tea set of the ware to England's Queen Charlotte.

By all accounts, the queen was so pleased with the look and feel of Wedgwood’s creation that she gave him permission to market it as Queen’s Ware.

Despite its name, Queen’s Ware was not designed for royalty or special occasions. Accordingly, Wedgwood produced Queen’s Ware plates, cups, saucers, bowls, and even candlesticks.

Surfaces were typically gilded or enameled, with designs often taken from nature.

By 1766, Wedgwood had been named Potter to Her Majesty, and within just a few years, Queen’s Ware was so ubiquitous that Wedgwood’s competitors, especially those creating goods for the growing markets of the New World, took to calling their products Queen’s Ware, too.

Charlotte was not the only royal to fall for Wedgwood ware.

In 1773, Russia’s Catherine the Great ordered a 1,000-place setting known as the Frog Service after the green frog crest that sits in the oak-leaf border at the top of each piece.

Hand-painted scenes on the ware were of views near the new Wedgwood factory.

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